fuckyeahawesomehouses:

Schoolhouse to Modern Home

cjwho:

Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | via

Patrick Jouin and Sanjit Manky is a design tandem whose works meet at the crossroads of industrial production and craftsmanship. In all their projects they seek to maintain a balance between innovation and grace. Their latest project is a fine example of this rule. The designers rearranged the interior of an old Saint-Lazare priory to host a hotel and a restaurant. Over the centuries the building had served monks and nuns, been used as a hospice and at one point even a prison. In 1980s it was first transformed into a hotel. The project reinterprets the story of Saint-Lazare for the future. Corresponding with the space which avoids unnecessary stylistic effects, the designers introduced their own pared-down and elegant style. This resulted as a sensual and refined interior of a mystical, ancient monastery.

„We quietly slipped into the Saint-Lazare priory, immersing ourselves in its history and its uniqueness. We tried to capture its essence, from its monastic simplicity to its prison austerity via the wisdom and philosophy of those who built and lived here. Then we had to fine-tune our approach, to give life to a contemporary vision that would respect and preserve the spirit of the building. We didn’t want the visitor to forget where they were. On the contrary, we wanted to assure an intimate experience of the site, allowing the visitor to appropriate fragments of the past in comfort. Achieving this also meant rising to the challenge of the constraints imposed by the building’s classification as an historic monument, notably that we were not permitted to touch the ceilings and the walls. The best approach was to find a way to turn these constraints into opportunities.”

Photography: Nicolas Mathéus

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kazu721010:

OPSO restaurant / K-studio

kazu721010:

OPSO restaurant / K-studio

cjwho:

Farmhouse Renovation, Moorenweis, Germany by Buero Philipp Moeller | via

The renovation of a farmhouse erected in 1890 in the Fürstenfeldbruck district is focusing on the reorganization of the floor plan, the preservation of the basic structure, particularly the roof truss, and above all the creation of diverse and atmospherically dense interior rooms offering a very special living experience to a family of four.

In order to retain the typical character of a farmhouse consisting of living-dining area and utility rooms, the small room structures on the ground and first floor of the living area remain largely untouched. On the one hand, available or supplementary old objects such as doors, lamps or furniture support this aura. On the other hand, several rooms appear decidedly modern by using carefully matched colours, large wall panelling and fine wallpapers.

Fascinating spatial contrasts are being created by the combination of living area and former cowshed especially in the open attic floors. Black steel components complete or renew the construction of the sand-blasted wooden structure only where it was inevitable, whereas custom-made oiled oak floorboards up to seven meters long and small new fittings are shaping the spatial structure.

Photography: Benjamin A. Monn

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archatlas:

MAS | Museum Aan de Stroom Neutelings Riedijk Architects

arkitekcher:

Multidisciplinar Studio in Barcelona  |  Josep Ferrando Arquitectura + Roman Ortega
Location: Barcelona, Spain  |  Drawings: 1. 2. 3

onceuponawildflower:

AGGRESSIVELY PASSIVE MAINE DORM

Where mini-fridges aren’t allowed and a single hairdryer can heat the place in winter
Read more here.
(Source: Sierra Mag)
bruxistbodhisattva:

Paraguay, Steve McCurry

archatlas:

Long Museum (West Bund) Atelier Deshaus

"The new design adopts the cantilever structure featuring “vault-umbrella” with independent walls while the shear walls with free layout are embedded into the original basement so as to be concreted with the original framework structure. With the shear walls, the first underground floor of the original parking has been transformed to an exhibition space with the overground space highlighting multiple orientations because of the relative connection of the “vault-umbrella” at different directions; besides, the electrical & mechanical system has been integrated in the “vault-umbrella” structure. As to the overground space covered by the “vault-umbrella”, the walls and the ceiling feature as-cast-finish concrete surface so that their geometrical dividing line seems faint. Such structure cannot only shield the human body in conformation but visually echoes with the Coal-Hopper-Unloading-Bridge at the wharf. Moreover, the building’s internal space can also represent a kind of primordial and tameless charm while the spatial dimension, large or small, and the as-cast-finish concrete surface with the seam among moulding boards and the bolt holes bring a sense of reality as well. The directness and simplicity resulting from this “literal” structure, material and space plus the sense of force or lightness because of large-scale overhanging style enables the overall building’s continuation of the industrial property of the original site, not only in time but in space."

arkitekcher:

PATIO  Yaita and Associates
Location: Tokyo, Japan  |  + Section